A Rush of Blood to the Shed

We recently built a shed. I know that sounds impressive, but its probably not exactly what you’re thinking. The image I conjure up when thinking about building a shed is the “raise a barn on Monday, soon I’ll raise another” part of Weird Al’s “Amish Paradise.” It’s kind of like that but not really.

amish paradise raise a barn on mondayAs you may remember, we have a shed behind the house but it isn’t ours. It is on the subdivided/sold-but-vacant lot behind our property. The original owners of the house owned two adjacent pieces of property and when the time came to sell, they were sold separately. So now we have a huge vacant lot with a big ole shed and lots of hurricane debris sitting just beyond our backyard. Sounds exciting, but to be honest I’m glad the ole shed isn’t our responsibility. It’s kinda smelly. This new shed looked real spiffy in the brochure and it was on some sort of sale, so we jumped on it.

rubbermaid shed brochureThe shed is a Rubbermaid resin shed that comes delivered from Lowe’s by an old man with a forklift* and a big truck.

shed parts backyardYou can see the pallet in the background and the pieces starting to look like parts of a shed. Everything came labeled and the instructions were real simple.  The weird thing is that at the end you’re left with a pallet. What am I gonna do with a random busted up pallet?! Where’s a bonfire when you need one?!

shed floor level groundI picked the location for this shed not based on how level the ground was, but how cute I thought it’d be. Well, that’s only half true. The ground should have been more level but this spot was too perfect to pass up. This bold decision would ultimately come back to bite me in the ass later, but it ended up OK. If I have one bit of advice for a future junior shed builder out there, it would be to make sure you try and level your ground, even if it’s just a little. This pocket of our yard is full of sandy soil, so I was fighting a losing battle.

raise a barn shedAs it’s going up it all feels real flimsy, but it ends up fitting together. (Obviously, or else we wouldn’t be here talking about this shed). Everything snaps together with limited drilling and screw-driving.

shed one wallSee that soap there? Yeah. The shed requires a little bit of old fashioned lubing to slide the walls together. Way less messy than industrial graphite. I know from experience, bro.

shed finishingHere’s the part where the level ground is crucial. All of the components fit into place nicely, but then BAM and you need to slide some pins into the roof to hold it down. While doing so I sliced my hand and we both got real frustrated. In the end we just gave up on 1 of 6 pins. Everything seemed level and secure so we didn’t sweat it.

completed Rubbermaid resin shedThere it is, done in time for sunset over the Waackaack Creek. From the front yard and driveway that are just behind it, it is barely noticeable, and from this view it is nestled between the fences. The area needs some landscaping, but that will come in due time.

The resin makes the inside of the shed feel really muggy when it gets warm and there is moisture in the air. Luckily there are optional “gills” that can be cut near the roof to let the thing breathe. All in all, it took 2 people about 5 hours to complete. Not bad considering we’ve now got 7′ x 7′ of outdoor storage space we didn’t have before.

And now what you’ve really been waiting for. Amish Paradise.

*No old man guarantee. Lowe’s delivery policy subject to change.